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Orpheus Calrdonius: 

o R, A 

COLLECTION 

o F 

SCOTS SONGS. 

Set to Mufick 
B ,Y 

W.. T H M S N. 

VOL. II. 

The Second Edition. 




LONDON: 

Printed for the Author, at his Houfe in 

Leic eft er -Fields* 

M,dcc..xxxiij. 





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T O 



HER GRACE THE 



Dutchefs of Hamilton 



ADAM, 



npHE firft Volume of thefe 

-* Songs having appear'd 

under the Prote&ion of her 

Majefty ; where cou'd I hope 

A z to 



DEDICATION. 

to find a proper Patronefs 
for the fecond, but in the 
Dutchefs of Hamilton! 

Tho' being allow'd the Ho- 
nour of flieltring them under 
your Grace's Name, is rather 
making a Demand for new Fa- 
vours, than gratefully acknow- 
ledging numberlefs Obligations 
pad ; yet I had no other way 
left, to declare publickly how 
much I am, 

MADAM, 

Your Grace's mofi De voted 
and moft Obliged 

Humble Servant, 

William Thomson* 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 



VOL. II. 



I. 



CromletV Lilt. 




IN C E allthy Vows, falfe Maid, 

Arc blown to Air, 
And my poor Heart bctray'd 
To fad Defpair, 
Into fome Wildcrnefs, 
My Grief I will exprefs, 
And thy Hard-heartednefs, 

O cruel Fair. 



Vol. II. 



B 



Have 



2 Orpheus Caledonius, 

Have I not graven our Loves 

On every Tree : 

In yonder fpreading Groves, 

Tho' falfe thou be: 

Was not a folemn Oath 

Plighted betwixt us both, 

Thou thy Faith, I my Troth, 

Conftant to be? 

Some gloomy Place I'll find, 

Some doleful Shade, 
Where neither Sun nor Wind 

E'er Entrance had : 
Into that hollow Cave, 
There will I figh and rave, 
Becaufe thou do'ft behave 

So faithlcflly. 

Wild Fruit mail be my Meat, 

I'll drink the Spring, 
Cold Earth fhall be my Seat : 

For covering 
I'll have the {tarry Sky 
My Head to canopy, 
Until my Soul on high 

Shall fpread its Wing. 1 



I'll 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



I'll have no funeral lire, 

Nor Tears for me : 
No Grave do I defire, 

Nor Obfequies : 
The courteous Red-Breaft he, 
With Leaves will cover me, 
And fmg my Elegy, 

With doleful Voice. 

And when a Ghoft I am, 

I'll vifit thee : 
O thou deceitful Dame, 

Whofe Cruelty 
Has kill'd the kindeft Heart, 
That e'er felt Cupid's Dart, 
And never can defert 

From loving thee. 




B 2 



II, 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




IL 



My Deary, if thou die. 



LOVE never more fhall give me pain, 
My Fancy's fix'd on thee ; 
Nor ever Maid my Heart fhall gain, 

My 'Peggy*) if thou die. 
Thy Beauties did fuch Pleafure give, 

Thy Love's fo true to me : 
Without thee I mall never live, 
My Deary, if thou die. 

If Fate fhall tear thee from my Breaft, 

How fhall I lonely ftray > 
In dreary Dreams the Night I'll wade, 

In Sighs the filent Day. 
I ne'er can fo much Virtue find, 

Nor fuch Perfection fee: 
Then I'll renounce all Woman-kind, 

My Teggj, after thee. 

No new-blown Beauty fires my Heart 
With Cupid's raving Rage, 



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_My Deary if thoy. Die 




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Orpheus Caledonius. 5 

But thine which can fuch Sweets impart, 

Mud all the World engage, 
Twas flltl^that like the Morning Sun, 

Gave Jkgs, and Life to me j 
And when it's deftin d Day is done, 

With Peggy let me die. 

Ye Fowers that fmile on virtuous Love, 

And in fuch Pleafure fhare ; 
You who it's faithful Flames approve, 

With pity view the Fair. 
Reftore my Peggy's wonted Charms, 

Thofe Charms fo dear to me j 
Oh ! never rob them from thefe Arms : 

I'm loft, if Peggy die. 




III. 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




III. 

Sae Merry as we have been. 

NO W Thxbus advances on high, 
Nae Footfteps of Winter are feen ; 
The Birds carrol fweet in the Sky, 

And Lambkins dance Reels on the Green. 
Thro' Plantings, by Burnies fae clear, 

We wander for Pleafure and Health, 
Where Buddings and Bloffoms appear, 
Giving Profpects of Joy and Wealth. 

View ilka gay Scene all around, 

That arc, and that promife to be i 
Yet in them a' nathing is found, 

Sae perfcd Eliza as thee : 
Thy Een the clear Fountains excel, 

Thy Locks they out-rival the Grove ; 
When Zephyrs thofe plcafingly fwell, 

Ilk Wave makes a Captive to Love. 



The Rofcs and Lillies combin'd, 
And Flowers of maift delicate Hue, 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 

By thy Cheek and dear Breafts are out-fhin'd, 
Their Tinctures are naithing fae true. 

What can we compare with thy Voice ? 
And what with thy Humour fae fweet ? 

Kac Mufic can blefs with fie Joys ; 
Sure Angels are juft fae complete. 

Fair Bloffom of ilka Delight, 

Whofe Beauties ten thoufand out-mine ; 
Thy Sweets mall be lading and bright, 

Being mixt with fae many divine. 
Ye Powers, who have given fie Charms 

To Eliza, your Image below, 
O fave her frae all human Harms ! 

And make her Hours happily flow. 




IV. 



8 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



IV. 
The Bonny Earl of Murray. 

YE Highlands and ye Lawlands, 
Oh ! where ha'e ye been : 
They ha'e (lain the Earl of Murray, 
And they laid him on the Green. 

Now wae be to thee Huntly, 
And wherefore did ye fae ; 
I bad you bring him wi' you, 
But forbad you him to flae. 

He was a braw Gallant, 
And he rid at the Ring ; 
And the bonny Earl of Murray, 
Oh! he might have been a King. 

He was a braw Gallant, 
And he play'd at the Ba', 
And the bonny Earl of Murray, 
Was the Flower amang them a\ 



He was a braw Gallant, 
And he play'd at the Glove, 



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And the bonny Earl of Murray, 
Oh ! he was the Queen's Love. 

Gh! lang will his Lady, 
Look o'er the C2AWz- c Down> 
E'er fhe fee the Earl of Murray, 
Come founding through the Town. 



9 




Vol. II, 



V. 



10 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




V. 

'The Widow. 



TH E Widow can bake, and the Widow can 
brew, 
The Widow can fhape, and the Widow can few, 
And mony braw things the Widow can do ; 

Then have at the Widow, my Laddie. 
With Courage attack her, baith early and late, 
To kifs her and clap her ye mauna be blate ; 
Speak well, and do better, for that's the beft Gate 
To win a young Widow, my Laddie. 

The Widow (he's youthfti', and never a Hair 
The war of the Wearing, and has a good Skair 
Of every thing lovely ; fhe's witty and fair, 

And has a rich jointure, my Laddie. 
What cou'd ye wifh better your Pleafure to crown, 
Than a Widow, the bonnieft Toaft in the Town, 
With naithing, but draw in your Stool and fit down 

And fport with the Widow, my Laddie \ 

Then till'cr and kill' cr with Courtefie dead, 
Tho' (lark Love and Kindnefs be all ye can plead . 

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Orpheus Caledonius. 



ii 



Be heartfome and airy, and hope to fucceed, 
With a bonny gay Widow, my Laddie. 

Strike Iron while 'tis het, if ye'd have it to wald, 

For Fortune ay favours the active and bauld ; 

But ruins the Woer that's thowlefs and cauld. 
Unfit for the Widow, my Laddie. 




VI, 



12 OrpheusCaledonius. 





Tie Wawking of the Faulds. 

Y Peggy is a young thing, 
Juft entered in her Teens, 
Fair as the Day, and fweet as May. 
fair as the Day, and always gay. 
My 'Peggy is a young thing, 

And I'm not very auld, 
Yet well I like to meet her at 

The Wawking of the Fauld. 
My Peggy fpcaks fee fweetly, 
Whene'er we meet alanc, 
I wifhnac mair, to lay my Care, 
I wifh nae mair, of a' that's rare. 
My Peggy fpcaks fae fweetly, 
To a' the Lave I'm cauld s 
But fhe gars a' my Spirits glow 
At Wawking of the Fauld. 



My Peggy fmiles fo kindly, 
Whene'er I whifper Love, 
That I look down on a' the Town, 
That I look down upon a Crown. 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 13 

My Teggy fmiles fae kindly, 

It makes me blyth and bauld, 
And naithing gives me fie Delight, 
As Wawkingof the Fauld. 
My 'Peggy ftngs fae faftly, 

When on my Pipe I play 5 
By a' the reft, it is confeft, 
By a' the reft, that me fings beft. 
My Teggy fings fae faftly, 

And in her Sangs are tald, 
With Innocence the Wale of Senfe, 
At Wawking of the Fauld. 




VII. 



14 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




VII. 
Jocky /aid to Jeany. 

JOcky faid to Jeany > Jeany, wilt thou do't ? 
Ne'er a fit, quo' Jeany y for my Tocher- 
good i 
For my Tocher-good, I winna marry" thee. 
E'ens ye like, quo' Jonny, ye may let it be. 

I ha' Gowd and Gear, I ha' Land eneugh, 
I ha' feven good Owfen ganging in a Pleugh ; 
Ganging in a Pleugh, and lingking o'er the Lee, 
And gin ye winna take me, I can let ye be. 

I ha* a good Ha' Houfe, a Barn, and a Byer, 

A Stack afore the Door, I'll make a rantin 

Fire ; 
I'll make a rantin Fire, and merry fhall we be > 
And gin ye winna take me, I can let ye be. 



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Jeany faid to Jocky, gin ye winna tell, 
Ye fhall be the Lad, I'll be the Lafs ray fell : 
Ye'rea bonny Lad, and I'm a Laflie free, 
Ye're welcomer to take me, than to let me be. 




VIII. 



i6 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




VIII. 

Dumbarton'.? Drums. 




JJmbart ori 's Drums beat bonny — O, 
When they mind me of my teztjonny •— < O 

How happy am I, 

When my Soldier is by, 
While he kiffes and bleffes his Annie — O ! 
"Tis a Soldier alone can delight me — O, 
For his graceful Looks do invite me — * O : 

While guarded in his Arms, 

I'll fear no War's Alarms, 
Neither Danger nor Death mail e'er fright me~(X 

My Love is a handfome Laddie— O, 
Genteel, but ne'er foppifh nor gaudy — O : 

Tho' Commiflions are dear, 

Yet I'll buy him one this Year ; 
For he fhall ferve no longer a Cadie — O. 
A Soldier has Honour and Bravery— O, 
Unacquainted with Rogues and their Knavery — O: 

He minds no other thing, 

But the Ladies or the King 5 
For every other Care is but Slavery ^ O. 

Then 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 17 

Then I'll be the Captain's Lady — O, 
Farewell all my Friends and my Daddy — Oj 
I'll wait no more at home, 
But 111 follow with the Drum, 
And whene'er that beats, I'll be ready — O. 
c Dumbartotfs Drums found bonny — O, 
They are fprightly like my dear Jonny — O : 
How happy fhall I be, 
When on my Soldier's Knee, 
And he kilfes and bleffes his Annie — O I 




Vol. II. D IX. 



8 Orpheus Caledonius. 



IX. 
Ye Gods ! was Strephon'x PiEiure bleft. 

YE Gods ! was StrephotPs Pi&ure bleft, 
With the fair Heaven of Chloes Breaft 
Movefofter, thou fond fluttering Heart, 

Oh gentle throb, too fierce thou art. ] 

Tell me, thou brighteft of thy Kind, 
For Strephon was the Blifs defign'd j 
For Strephon 's fake, dear charming Maid, 
Didft thou prefer his wand 'ring Shade. ? 

And thou bleft Shade, that fweetly art 

Lodg'd fo near my Chloe's Heart, 

For me the tender Hour improve, 

And foftly tell how dear I love. 

Ungrateful thing ! it fcorns to hear 

Its wretched Mailer's ardent Pray "r, 

Ingrofling all that beauteous Heaven, 

That Chloe, lavifli Maid, has given. 

\ 
I cannot blame thee : were I Lord 

Of all the Wealth thofe Breads afford y 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 

I'd be a Mifer too, nor give 
An Alms to keep a God alive. 
Oh fmile not thus, my lovely Fair, 
On thefe cold Looks, that lifelefs Air, 
Prize him whofe Bofom glows with Fire, 
With eager Love and foft Defire. 

'Tis true, thy Charms, O powerful Maid, 
To Life can bring the filent Shade : 
Thou can'ft furpafs the Painter's Art*; 
And real Warmth and Flames impart. 
But oh ! it ne'er can love like me, 
I've ever lov'd, and lov'd but thee : 
Then, Charmer, grant my fond Requeft, 
Say thou can'ft love, and make me bled. 



19 




D 



X. 



SO 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



X. 

For our lang biding here, 

WH E N we came to London Town, 
We dream'd of Gowd in Gowpings here. 
And rantinly ran up and down, 
In rifing Stocks to buy a Skair : 

We daftly thought to row in Rowth, 
But for our Daffine pay'd right dear ; 
The Lave will fare the war in trout h, 
For our lang biding here. 

But when we fand our Purfes toom, 
And dainty Stocks began to fa*, 
We hang our Lugs, and vvi' a Gloom, 
Girn'd at Stock-jobbing ane and a'. 

If we gang near the South-Sea Houfe, 
The Whilly- Wha's will grip ye'r gear. 
Syne a' the Lave will fare the war, 
For our lang biding here. 



XI, 



IO 



SLotp 



JFor our lana bidina here 



f i ■ i g J 1 ■ *-h ^pp 



W3ie.iL we came to London. Towncwe 



a=a 



s 



•{ dreajnd o£ Go~wd i 



JL J 1 | j | 



in ixowpings Jb.ere, and 



i^fc 



^^ 



P^§Eg5 p pfe E ^-JU 



rantxnly ran uj) and down, in rifinc Stocks to 



-P~ 



ISIP 



Btiv a £kair 



'£E 



1 



■I I it I 



II 



Leader Haircjis and Yarrow 

i 



Wlien rhaebus brj 



m 



' p > . .o 



I 



E 



"Wlien rhoehits brigjit.the Azr rre Skies with. 



g^ 



Si 



-F- 



£ 



p 



V- 



l ^j^J JlJ^U/U 



a 



s "* Gulden 



3fc 




enliclitnetnlLe makes all Natures 



-*f=- 



j£ 






P 



e^g 



rife Herbs Trees am 




P 



B e airt i.es rife Herbs^Trees and Flowrshe airickneth 



ijeantL( 



^ppjg 



p 



f frH^ 



4- 



£ 



PPP 



E 



-Amongj-t-all thofe lie m akes. liis choice, and 



UJ:«r| r r J I J. -J > f I 

< wixh. deljcdit jio es tkor ow with. radient B earns an 



wxth-deli^ghLt^oes tkorow with. radient Beains y and 



( fg LJ p 



(ft! 



^r m fjsr c— f 




p 



E 



Hi y» 



'earns are Leader Haiiohs ZTL^\arro7!> . 



aSF 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



21 




XI. 

Leader Haughs and Yarrow. 

WHEN Thcebus bright, the azure Skies 
With golden Rays enlightneth, 
He makes all Nature's Beauties rife, 

Herbs, Trees and Flowers he quickneth : 
Amongft all thofe he makes his Choice, 

And with Delight goes thorow, 
With radient Beams and filver Streams, 
Ate Leader Haughs and Tarrow. 

When Aries the Day and Night, 

In equal length dividcth, 
Auld frofty Saturn takes his flight, 

Nae langer he abideth : 
Then Flora Queen, with Mantle green, 

Calls aff her former Sorrow, 
And vows to dwell with Ceres fell, 

In Leader Haughs and Tarrow. 



'Pan playing on his aiten Reed, 
And Shepherds him attending. 



Do 



22 Orpheus Caledonius. 

Do here refort, their Flocks to feed, 
The Hills and Haughs commending $ 

With Cur and Kent upon the Bent, 
Sing to the Sun, Good morrow, 

And fwear nae Fields mair Pleafures yield, 
Than Leader Haughs and Tarrow. 

An Houfe there ftands on Le ader-ftdc, 

Surmounting my defcriving, 
With Rooms fae rare, and Windows fair, 

Like 'Dedalus 1 contriving : 
Men pa fling by, do aftcn cry, 

In footh it hath nae Marrow j 
It ftands as fweet on Leader-fide, 

As Newark does on Tarrow. 

A Mile below wha lift to ride, 

They'll hear the Mavis fingingi 
Into St. Leonard's Banks fhe'll bide, 

Sweet birks her Head o'er hinging : 
The Lintwhite loud, and Trogne proud 3 

With tuneful Throats and narrow, 
Into St. Leonard's Banks they fing, 

As fweetly as in Tarrow. 

The Lapwing lilteth o'er the Lee, 
With nimble Wing flic fporteth, 



But 



Orpheus Caledonius. 22 



-»> 



But vows fhe'll flee far frae the Tree, 
Where ^Philomel refortcth : 

By Break of Day, the Lark can fay, 
I'll bid you a Good-morrow, 

I'll ftreek my Wing, and mounting fin 
O'er Leader Haughs and Tarrow. 



cy 



Tark, Wantan-waws, and Wooden cleugh, 

The Eaft and Welle rn Mainfes, 
The Wood of Landers fair eneugh, 

The Corns arc good in Blainfies 5 
Where Aits are fine, and fald be kind, 

That ifyefearch all thorow 
Mearns, Buchan, Mar, nane better are 

Than Leader Haughs and Tarrow. 

In Burn Mill-bog and Whttjlade Shaws, 

The fearful Hare fhe haunteth, 
Z?/7£-haugh and Braidwoodfheil fhe knaws, 

And Chapel-wood frequenteth : 
Yet when fhe irks, to Kaidfly Birks 

She rins, and fighs for forrow, 
That fhe fhou'd leave fweet Leader Haughs \ 

And cannot win to Tarrow. 

What fweeter Mufick wad ye hear, 
Than Hounds and Beigles crying > 



The 



24 Orpheus Caledonitjs. 

The ftarted Hare rins hard with fear, 

Upon her Speed relying. 
But yet her Strength, it fails at length, 

Nae Beilding can (he borrow 
In Sorrel's Field, Cleckman or Hags, 

And fighs to be in Tarrow. 

Por Rockwoody Rwgwood, Spoty, Shdg y 

With Sight and Scent purfue her, 
'Till ah ! her Pith begins to flag, 

Nae cunning can refcue her. 
O'er Dub and Dyke, o'er Seugh and Syke, 

She'll rin the Fields all thorow, 
'Till fail'd fhe fa's in Leader Haughs, 

And bids farewell to Tarrow. 

Sing Erjlington and Cowdenknows, 

Where Homes had anes commanding ; 
And Tirygrange with thy milk white Ews, 

Twixt Tweed afld Leader Handing : 
The Bird that flees throw Reedpath Trees, 

And Gledfworth Banks ilk morrow, 
May chant and fing, fweet Leader Haughs, 

And bonny Howms of Tarrow. 

But Minftrel Burn cannot aflfuage 
His Grief, while Life endureth, 



To 



Orpheus Caledonius. 

To fee the Changes of this Age, 
That fleeting Time procureth 5 

For mony a Place (lands in hard Cafe, 
Where blyth Fowk kend nae Sorrow, 

With Homes that dwelt on Leader-{\dc } 
And Scots that dwelt on Tarrow. 



25 




Y@l; 11. 



E 



JiHj 



26 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




XII. 



A Lafs with a Lump of Land. 



Gle me a Lafs with a Lump of Land, 
And we for Life mail gang thegither, 
Tho' daft or wife, I'll ne'er demand, 
Or black or fair, it makfna whether. 
I'm aff with Wit, and Beauty will fade, 

And blood alane is na worth a Shilling ; 
But (he that's rich, her Market's made, 
For ilka Charm about her is killing. 

Gi'c mc a Lafs with a Lump of Land, 

And in my Eofom I'll hug my Treafure $ 
Gin I had anes her Gear in my Hand, 

Should Love turn dowf, it will find Pieafurc. 
Laugh on wha likes, but there's my Hand, 

I hate with Poortith, tho' bonny, to meddle, 
Unlefsthey bring Cafh, or a Lump of Land, 

They'fc never get me to dance to their Piddle. 

There's meikle good Love in Bands and Bags, 
And Siller and Gowd's a Tweet Complexion ; 

But 



1%. 



cyULafs with a Ijump of Land 



fc ;■'£-&& m r f' r Jg I 



Grie Tae aLafs with, a lump of Land, and we £or 




.s wild, a liinip ox ±j an 

r i T- j 



is 



iff f g f MffM r fi 



Life fhallgang th.e gither, tno daft or wife,lll 
»■ ti • I J - J +T 1 1 • I 



■turi f r, |f ;r t ,rrg p|a 

never demand,or Black or Fair it maksnawni 



m B 



N • J 



ether Im 



i 



IS 



£ 



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j^ r a fl i r i 



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affwitn^tt / and-Beaiitjr"will fade and Blood alaneis 



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=* 



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p r, j' j J 1 a i r J 1 1 1 1 



no worth, a shilLingbntfhe that's lUch^her Market's 



f3=j= 



$ 



£ 



& 



$ 



f /r J1J31' f m R ^jSE 



• i » ■ 



made, for ilka Charm ab out ner is Killing . 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



27 



But Beauty and Wit, and Virtue in Rags, 
Have tint the Art of gaining Affe&ion : 

Love tips his Arrows with Woods and Parks, 
And Catties and Riggs, and Muirs and Meadows, 

And naithing can catch our modern Sparks, 
But well-tocher'd Laflfes or joynter'd Widows. • 




Ea 



XIII. 



2$ 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



xin. 

One Day I heard Mary fay. 

ON E Day I heard Mary fay, 
How fhall I leave thee ? 
Stay, deareft Adonis, ftay, 

Why wilt thou grieve me ? 
Alas ! my fond Heart will break, 

If thou mould leave me : 
I'll live and die for thy fake > 
Yet never leave thee. 



Say, lovely Adonis, fay, 
Has Mary deceived thee ? 

Did e'er her young Heart betray 
New Love, that has griev'd thee 5 

My conftant Mind ne'er fhall ftray, 
Thou may believe me. 

I'll love thee, Lad, Night and Day^ 

And never leave thee. 

Adonis ^ my charming Youth, 
What can relieve thee ? 



Can 



15 



* 



One\I)ay I Heard KABXjay 



f 




» 



One D ay I near d Mary f av How friall I 

IS 



5 



i 



r Mir i 1 1 



M j' j'ijUi!! i J.i'jinti J J 



Leave tkee;Stay dear eft Adonis, ftay, wWwilt thou 



3S 



i 



l 'in fir i | 



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? 



erieve me. .Alasinrvfoiid 

"Mi r.HiHH-tr 



^s 



Jb.e art will breaJt 



p Ji j i r •jurrti^f 



if thouflio-udcl leave me, 111 live arid Dve 



'* frjJ J- I J J ^ 



F=^ 



( jfj-njin^J i In 



| II « > H 



for thy sake, yet never leave thee 

,"^r i li i rir^ i 



■ 



Orpheus Caledonius, 29 

Can Mary thy Anguifh footh ? 

This Bread (hall receive thee. 
My Paflion can ne'er decay, 

Never deceive thee : 
Delight {hall drive Pain away, 

Pleafure revive thee. 

But leave thee, leave thee, Lad, 

How fhall I leave thee ? 
O ! that Thought makes me fad 5 

I'll never leave thee. 
Where would my Adonis fly ? 

Why does he grieve me ? 
Alas ! my poor Heart will die, 

If I fhould leave thee. 




XIV. 



3° 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




XIV. 

She raife and loot me in. 

TH E Night her fiient Sable wore, 
And gloomy were the Skies j 
Of glitt 'ring Stars appear'd no more 

Than thofe in Nellfs Eyes. 
When at her Father's Yate I knock'd, 

Where I had often been, 
She, fhrowded only, with her Smock, 
Arofe and loot me in. 



Faft lock'd within her clofe Embrace, 

She trembling flood afham'd 5 
Her fwelling Breaft and glowing Face, 

And ev'ry Touch enflamed. 
My eager P-ffion I obey d, 

Refolv'd the Fort to win 5 
And her fond Heart was loon betray'd, 

To yield and let me in. 

Then, then, beyond exprefling, 
Tran (porting was the Joy 5 



qJ he raife and loot me in 

m — ft- 



fill i i HIt Tt I ] n 

The^Nichiner silent Sable wore, and jrloomv 



5§E 



The ^15^ her silent Sable wore, and gloomy 



m 



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mm 



m 



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fee Stsi 



J 






werethe'fflEies i of (xHttfrite Stlars appeared no 



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to 






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more, than thlole in Nelly's Eyes ."when at lie 



P^ 



ME 



ffi'Ej i fttr I ; r t^tfH>H 



Fathers Yate I kno ckcl where I had of -ten b een, 



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s 



t i n. tr=F^=g 



/' rn f[r>r.ir f i f'fr i=LauUfe 

fkeshrawded on& -with.li.er $m.o ck, arofe and 
rv,*rf*«l - ft II • i - M Q 






5 



^n 



me in , 



JS 



^P 



Orpheus Caledonius. 31 

I knew no greater BJefling, 

So bleft a Man was I. 
And fhe, all ravifh'd with Delight, 

Bid me oft come again; 
And kindly vow'd, that ev'ry Night, 

She'd rife and let me in. 

But ah ! at lafi: fhe prov'd with Bairn, 

Andfighing fat and dull, 
And I that was as much concerned, 

Look'd e'en juft like a Fool. 
Her lovely Eyes with Tears ran o'er, 

Repenting her rafli Sin : 
She figh'd, and curs'd the fatal Hour, 

That e'er fhe loot me in. 

But who cou'd cruelly deceive, 

Or from fuch Beauty part : 
I lov'd her fo, I could not leave 

The Charmer of my Heart 5 
But wedded, and conceal'd our Crime : 

Thus all was well again ; 
And now (he thanks the happy Time 

That e'er fhe loot me in. 






xv. 



g2 Orpheus Caledonius. 



XV. 
Ew-Bughts Marion. 

WILL ye goto the Ew-bughts, Marion^ 
And wear in the Sheep wi' me 5 
The Sun mines fweet, my Marion, 

But nae haff fae fweet as thee. 
O Marion's a bonny Lafs, 

And theblyth blinks in her Eye 5 
And fain wad I marry Marion, 
Gin Marion wad marry me, 

There's Gowd in your Garters, Marion, 

And Silk on your white Haufs-bane \ 
lu' fain wad I kifs my Marion, 

At e'en when I come name. 
There's braw Lads in Earn/law, Marion, 

Wha gape, and glowr with their Eye, 
At Kirk when they fee my Marion > 

But nane of them lo'es like me. 

I've nine Milk-Ews, my Marion, 
A Cow and a brawny Quey ; 



I'll 



.15 



TLm = Buqhts JVtARio^r 





lllyeco to tke £w-birckts Mario n.) aii& 



Will ye go to tke £w-birekt s .Mario ?i ) aiii 



SE 



b 



f: 



^M^ f-H^f4i^^ 



wear in the Skeep wi' me; tke $xtn fkines 



>9E 



i 



4*^ 



s 



ttsofc 



^ 



/"f i ii , i fin, m I Mjni'11 



fweet^my .Ma rio7L ; bnt nae L afFlaeiweet as tkee. 



o* j J 






r i i n i h i 



yJjYLarioris a 



1 



J r r r,i [j Bp 

v and tke E lytk blinks 



*3=¥ 



O JvLarion's a bonnyLafsy a 




.j mnuj 



ij i 'J vJiT g ir muffrri 



in ker Eye ; an d fain wad I marry -Ma r ie> «j gin 



^^ 



m 



p 



s 




Ike wad marry me . 



**=# 



Hi 



E 



s 



-•-•- 









Orpheus Caledonius. 33 

111 gi'e them a' to my Marhn, 

Juft on her Bridal Day ; 
And ye's get a green Sey Apron, 

And Waiftcoat of the London brown, 
And wow but ye will bevap'ring, 

Whene'er ye gang to the Town. 

I'm young and flout, my Marion ; 

Nane dances like me on the Green ; 
And gin ye forfake me, Marion, 

I'll e'en gae draw up wi' Jean . 4 
Saeput on your Tear I'm s^ Marion, 

And Kyrtleof the Cramafie; 
And foon as my Chin has nae Hair on, 

I ihall come Welt, and fee ye. 




Vol. II. F ' XVI, 



34 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



XVI. 
The Braes 0/" Yarrow. 

BUSK yc, busk ye, my bonny, bonny Bride, 
Busk ye, busk ye, my winfom Marrow ; 
Busk ye, busk ye, my bonny, bonny Bride, 
And let us leave the Braes of Tarrow. 
Where got ye that bonny, bonny Bride, 
Where got ye that winfom Marrow ? 
I got her where I durft not well be feen, 
Puing the Birks on the Braes of Tarrow. 

Weep not, weep not, my bonny, bonny Bride, 
Weep not, weep not, my winfom Marrow ; 
Nor let thy Heart lament to leave 
Puing the Birks on the Braes of Tarrow. 
Why does fhe weep, thy bonny, bonny Bride ? 
Why does fhe weep, thy winfom Marrow ? 
And why dare ye nae mair well be feen, 
Puing the Birks on the Braes of Tarrow ? 

Lang mull flic weep, lang mud fhe, mull fhe weep ? 
Lang muft fhe weep with Dole and Sorrow, 

1 

And! 



zJhe Braes <rf Xarrow 




Jbuucye ,DTiTJiCye my DonnyDpniiyj^riae^TiiK/ye 

K'li' f r 1 J f J r I f T fj-^ 



yi-kuj-..^mii,y iiii 



bonirjrboniw" Bride axLdletirsJezveyBraes <£¥arrow 



;»tJ I f [ ir Ht i ff Hi 



I "Where ,got ve that b onny tf onmrliricle wiier e 



"WKere^ot ye tKat b onmrtloiiiiy'Bride, wJ&ere got 



3E 



^^S 




f 



i 



f\\\\\u\l\<U\M\\lii* 

ye that WnuomMarrowl trotherwherel dnrft not well be 



ye that winj^mMarroA^l^otberwiierel dnrft not 



mm 



a fig ? 



P 



P r |fl J' i 



pa^if 



mtne 



FF? 



Bt 



feeji Piling; theBirks o, 



3E 




irjcs-on 

m 



Braes o£ Yarrow . 



e 



s 



r r ' ' i 



-t-t- 



Orpheus Caledonius. 35 

And lang mufti nae mair well be feen, 
Puing the Birks on the Braes of Tarrow. 
For flie has tint her Lover, Lover dear, 
Her Lover dear, the Caufe of Sorrows 
And I have (lain the comelieft Swain, 
That ever pued Birks on the Braes of Tarrow. 

Why. runs thy Stream, O Tar row, Tarrow 7 reid ? 
Why on thy Braes heard the Voice of Sorrow ? 
And why yon melancholious Weeds, 
Hung on the bonny Birks of Tarrow ? 
What's yonder floats on the rueful, rueful Flood ? 
What's yonder floats ? O Dole and Sorrow, 
O 'tis the comely Swain I flew, 
Upon the doleful Braes of Tarrow. 

Warn, O warn his Wounds, his Wounds in Tears, 

His Wounds in Tears of Dole and Sorrow, 

And wrap his Limbs in mourning Weeds, 

And lay him on the Braes of Tarrow. 

Then build, then build, ye Sifters, Sifters fad, 

Ye Sifters fad, his Tomb with Sorrow > 

And weep around in woful Wife, 

His helplefs Fate on the Braes of Tarrow. 

Curie ye, curfeye, his ufelefs, ufelcfs Shield, 
My Arm that wrought the Deed of Sorrow > 

F 2 The. 



36 Orpheus Caledonius. 

The fatal Spear that pierc'd his Breaft, 
His comely Breaft on the Braes of Tar row. 
Did I not warn thee not to, not to love, 
And warn from Fight ? but to my Sorrow, 
Too rafhly bold, aftrongcr Arm 
Thou met'ft, and fell on the Braes of Tarrow ? 

Sweet fmells the Birk, green grows, green grows the 

Grafs, 
Yellow on Tawowh Braes the Gowan j 
Fair hangs the Apple frae the Rock, 
Sweet the Wave of Tarrow flowan. 
Flows Tarrow fwcer, as fweet, as fweet flows Tweedy 
As green its Grafs, its Gowan as yellow, 
As fweet fmells on its Braes the Birk, 
The Apple from its Rocks as mellow. 

fair was thy Love, fair, fair indeed thy Love, 
In flow'ry Bands thou himdid'ft fetter •> 
Tho' he was fair, and well-belov'd again, 
Than me he never lov'd thee better. 
Busk ye, then busk, my bonny, bonny Bride, 
Busk ye, then busk, my winfom Marrow; 
Busk ye, and lo'e me on the Banks of Tweedy 
And think nae mair on the Braes of Tarrow. 

How can I busk a bonny, bonny Bride ? 
How can I busk a winfom Marrow ? 

How 



Orpheus Caledonius. 37 

How Jo'e him on the Banks of Tweed, 
That flew my Love on the Braes of Tarrow, 

Tarrow Fields, may never, never Rain, 
No Dew thy tender Bloffoms cover, 

For there was vileJy kill'd my Love, 
My Love as he had not been a Lover, 

The Boy put on his Robes, his Robes of Green, 

His purple Veft, 'twas my awn fewing, 

Ah ! wretched me, I little, little knew, 

He was in thefe to meet his Ruin. 

The Boy took out his milk-white, milk-white Steed, 

Unheedful of my Dole and Sorrow 5 

But e'er the Toofal of the Night, 

He lay a Corps on the Braes of Tarrow. 

Much I rejoic'd that woeful, woeful Day, 

1 fung, my Voice the Woods returning 5 
But lang e'er Night the Spear was flown, 
That (lew my Love, and left me mourning. 
What can my barbarous, barbarous Father do, 
But with his cruel Rage purfue me ? 

My Lover's Blood is on thy Spear ; 

How can'ft thou, barbarous, Man, then woo me ? 

My happy Sifters may be, may be proud, 
With cruel and ungentle Scoffing, 
May bid me feek on Tarrow* s Braes^ 
My Lover nailed in his Coffin. 

My 



38 Orpheus Caledonius. 

My Brother 'Douglas may upbraid, 

And drive with threatning Words to move me; 

My Lover's Blood is on thy Spear, 

How can ft thou ever bid me love thee ? 



Yes, yes, prepare the Bed, the Bed of Love, 
With bridal Sheets my Body cover j 
Unbar, ye bridal Maids, the Door, 
Let in the expected Husband Lover. 
But who the expected Husband, Husband is ? 
His Hands, methink, are bath'd in Slaughter 3 
Ah me ! what ghaftly Spectre's yon, 
Comes, in his pale Shroud, bleeding after > 



Pale as he is, here lay him, lay him down, 
O lay his cold Head on my Pillow * 7 
Take aff, take aff thefe bridal Weeds, 
And crown my careful Head with yellow. 
Pale tho' thou art, yet beil, yet belt belov'd, 
O could my Warmth to Life reftore thee 5 
Yet lie all flight between my Breads ; 
No Youth lay ever there before thee. 

Pale, pale indeed, O lovely, lovely Youth ! 
Forgive, forgive lb foul a Slaughter; 
And lie all Night between my Breads, 
No Youth Ihall ever lie there after. 



Re- 



Orpheus Caledonius. 

Return, return, O mournful, mournful Bride, 
Return and dry thy ufelefs Sorrow, 
Thy Lover heeds nought of thy Sighs, 
He lies a Corps in the Braes of Tarrow. 



39 




XVII 



40 Orpheus Caledonius. 




XVII. 
Lady Anne Bothwef j Lament* 

BAlow, my Boy, lie ftill and fleep, 
It grieves me fore to hear thee weep ; 
Ifthou'lt beftlent, I'll be glad, 
Thy Mourning makes my Heart full fad. 
Balow, my Boy, thy Mother's Joy, 
Thy Father bred me great Annoy. 
Balow, &c. 

Balow, my Darling, fleep a while, 
And when thou wak'ft,then fweetly fmile j 
But fmile not as thy Father did, 
To cozen Maids, nay God forbid: 
For in thine Eye, his Look I fee, 
The tempting Look that ruin'd me. 
Balow , &c. 

When he began to court my Love, 
And with his fugar'd Words to move j 

His 



Jady ANN, BOTHWEL$ Jament 






,i mm j 



B alo-wrmy B ojr lye ftLll and f leep ,' it 



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f/".i j in n 1 1 i gl iini f 

^reresm.eijore to .hear tkeeweeD-rFtho-altbe-filent 



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grieves meioxe to .hear tkeeweep;if thonltbefllent 

3 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 41 

His tempting Face and flatt'ring Ghear, 
In time to me did not appear ; 
But now I fee, that cruel he, 
Cares neither for his Babe nor me. 
Balow 9 &c. 

Farewell, farewell, thou falfeft Youth, 
That ever kilt a Woman's Mouth, 
Let never any after me, 
Submit unto thy Courtefy : 
For, if they do, O ! cruel thou, 
Wilt her abufe, and care not how, 
BaloWy &c. 

I was too cred'lous at the firft, 
To yield thee all a Maiden durft, 
Thou fwore for ever true to prove, 
Thy Faith unchang'd, unchang'd thy Love j 
But quick as Thought the Change is wrought, 
Thy Love's no more, thy Promife nought. 
B alow j &c. 

I wifh I were a Maid again, 
From young Men's Flattery I'd refrain j 
For now unto my Grief I find, 
They are all perjur'd and unkind : 
Bewitching Charms bred all my Harms., 
Witnefs my Babe lies in my Arms. 
Balowt &c. 

Vol. II. G I 



42 Orpheus Caledonius. 

I take my Fate from bad to worfe, 
That I mud needs be now a Nurfe, 
And lull my young Son on my Lap, 
From me fweet Orphan, take the Pap. 
Balow, my Child, thy Mother mild 
Shall wail as from all Blifs exil'd. 
Balow, &c. 

Balow, my Boy, weep not for me, 
Whofegreateft Grief's for wronging thee j 
Nor pity herdeferved Smart, 
Who can blame none but her fond Heart : 
For, too foon trufting lateft finds, 
With faireft Tongues are falfcft Minds, 
Balow, &c. 

Balow, my Boy, thy Father's fled, 
When he the thriftlefs Son has play'd, 
Of Vows and Oaths, forgetful he 
Frefer'd the Wars to thee and me. 
But now, perhaps, thy Curfe and mine, 
Make him eat Acorns with the Swine, 
Balow, &c. 

But curfe not him, perhaps now he, 
Stung with Remorfc, is blcffingthec: 



Per- 



Orpheus Caledoni us. 4^ 

Perhaps at Death ; for who can tell, 
Whether the Judge of Heaven or Hell, 
By fome proud Foe has ftruck the Blow, 
And laid the dear DeceLver low ? 
BaloWy &c. 

I wifh I were into the Bounds, 
Where he lies fmother'd in his Wounds, 
Repeating, as he pants for Air, 
My Name, whom once he call'd his Fair. 
No Woman's yet fo fiercely fet, 
But fhe'll forgive, tho' not forget. 
Ba/ow, &c. 

If Linnen lacks, for my Love's fake, 
Then quickly to him would I make 
My Smock once for his Body meet, 
And wrap him in that Winding-meet. 
Ah me ! how happy had I been, 
If he had ne'er beenWapt therein! 
Balow, &c. 

Balow, my Boy, I'll weep for thee ; 
Too foon, alake, thou'lt weep for me : 
Thy Griefs are growing to a Sum, 
God grant thee patience when they come ; 

G 2 Born 



44 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



Born to fuftain thy Mother's Shame, 
A haplefs Fate, a Baftard's Name. 
Balowy &c. 




XVIII 



18 



Corn JRiags are JBo 




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Orpheus Caledonius. 45 



XVIII. 
Corn Riggs are bonny. 

MY *Patie is a Lover gay, 
His Mind is never muddy, 
His Breath is fweeter than new Hay, 

His Face is fair and ruddy. 
His Shape is handfome, middle Size ; 

He's (lately in his wawking: 
The mining of his Een furprifc $ 
Tis Heaven to hear him tawking. 

Laft Night I met him on a Bawfc, 

Where yellow Corn was growing, 
There mony a kindly Word he fpake, 

That fet my Heart a glowing. 
He kifs'd, and vow'd he wad be mine, 

And loo'd me beft of ony ; 
That gars me like to fing finfyne, 

OCom Riggs are bonny. 



Let Maidens of a {illy Mind, 

Refufe what maift they're wanting, 



Since 



4 6 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



Since we for yielding are defign'd, 
We chaftly fhould be granting : 
Then I'll comply, and marry Tate, 

And fyne my Cockernony, 
He's free to touzle air or late, 

Where Corn Riggs are bonny. 




XIX. 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 47 



XIX. 
The auld Goodman. 

LAte in an Evening forth I went, 
A little before the Sun gade down, 
And there I chanc'd by Accident, 

To light on a Battle new begun. 
A Man and his Wife was fawn in a Strife, 
I canna well tell ye how it began -, 
But ay fhe wail'd her wretched Life, 
And cry'd ever, alake my auld Goodman^ 

He. 

Thy auld Goodman, that thou tells of, 
The Country kens where he was born, 
Was but a filly poor Vagabond, 

And ilka ane leugh him to fcorn : 
For he did fpend, and make an end 

Of Gear, that his Forefathers wan, 
He gart the Poor (land frae the Door, 

Sae tell nae mair of thy auld Goodman. 



She. 



48 Orpheus Caledonius. 

She. 
My Heart alake, is liken to break, 

When I think on my winfome John, 
His blinkan Eye and Gate fae free, 

Was naithing like thee, thou dofend Drone. 
His rofie Face and flaxen Hair, 

And a Skin as white as ony Swan, 
Was large and tall, and comely withal, 

And thou'lt never be like my auld Goodman. 

He. 

Why doft thou pleen ? I thee maintain, 

For Meal and Mawt thou difna want ; 
But thy wild Bees I canna pleafe, 

Now when our Gear gins to grow fcant, 
Of Houfhold Stuff thou haft enough, 

Thou wants for neither Pot nor Pan ; 
Of ficklike Ware he left thee bare, 

Sae tell nae mair of thy auld Goodman. 

She. 

Yes I may tell, and fret my fell, 

To think on thefe blyth Days I had, 
When he and I together lay 

In Arms, into a well-made Bed. 
But now I fish, and may be fad, 

Thy Courage iscauld,thy Colour wan, 
Thou falds thy Feet, and fa s afleep, 

And thou'lt ne'er be like my auld Goodman, 

Then 



Orpheus Caledonius, 

Then coming was the Night fae dark, 

And gane was a' the Light of Day ; 
The Carle was fear'd to mifs his Mark, 

And therefore wad nae 1 anger flay : 
Then up he gat, and he ran his way, 

I trow the Wife the Day (he wan, 
And ay the o'erword of the Fray 

Was ever, Alake my auld Goodman. 



49 







Vol. II. 



H 



XX. 



|p Orpheus Caledonius. 



XX. 

Lochaber, 

FArewell to Lcchaher,zr\<\ farewell my Jean, 
Where hcartfome with thee I've mony Day 
been ; 
For Lochaber no more, Lechaber no more, 
We'll may be return to Lochaber no more. 
Thefe Tears that I filed, they ate a for my Dear, 
And no for the Dangers attending on weir 5 
Tho' bore on rough Seas to a far bloody Shore, 
May be to return to Lachaber no more. 

Tho' Hurricanes rife, and rife ev'ry Wind, 
They'll ne'er make a Temped like that in my Mind. 
Tho' loudeft of Thunder on louder Waves roar, 
That's naithing like leaving my Love on the Shore. 
To leave thee behind me, my Heart is fair pain'd, 
By Eafe that's inglorious, no Fame can be gain'd : 
'And Beauty and Love's the Reward of the Brave, 
And I muft deferve it before I can crave. 

Then glory, myjeany y maun plead my Excufe, 
Since Honour commands me ? how can I refufe? 

Without 



20 

LOCHABEH 

*for 2/ Voices 



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51 



Without it I ne'er can have Merit for thee ; 
And without thy Favour, I'd better not be ! 
I gae then, my Lafs, to win Honour and Fame, 
And if I mould luck to come gloridufly name, 
I'll bring a Heart to thee with Love running o'er," 
And then I'll leave thee and Lochaber no more. 




Hi 



XXI 



52 Orpheus Caledonitjs. 




XXI. 
As Sylvia in a For eft lay. 

AS Sylvia in a Forcft lay, 
To vent her Woe alone ; 
Her Swain Sylvander came that Way, 

And heard her dying Moan. 
Ah ! is my Love (me faid) to you, 

So worthlefs and fo vain ? 
Why is your wonted Fondnefs now 
Converted to Difdain •? 

You vow'd the Light mould Darknefs turn, 

E'er you'd exchange your Love ; 
In Shades now may Creation mourn, 

Since you unfaithful prove. 
Was it for this I Credit gave 

To ev'ry Oath you fwore > 
But ah ! it feems they raoft deceive, 

Whomoftour Charms adore. 

'Tis plain, your Drift was all Deceit, 
The Practice of Mankind: 



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1 



Orpheus Caledonius. 53 

Alas ! I fee it but too late, 

My Love had made me blind. 
For you, delighted I could die : 

But oh! with Grief I'm fill'd, 
To think that credulous conftantl 

Should by yourfelf be kill'd. 

This faid all breathlefs, fick and pale, 

Her Head upon her Hand, 
She found her vital Spirits fail, 

And Senfes at a ftand. 
Sylvander then began to melt : 

But e'er the Word was given, 
The heavy Hand of Death (he felt, 

And figh'd her Soul to Heaven. 




XXDL- 



54 Orpheus Caledonius, 





XXII. 
When abfent from the Nymph I love* 

J"Hen abfent from the Nymph I love, 
I'd fain make off the Chains I wear ; 
Eat whilft I ftrivc thefe to remove, 
More Fetters I'm oblig'd to bear. 
My captiv'd Fancy Day and Night, 

Fairer and fairer reprefents 
Belinda, form'd for dear Delight, 
But cruel Gaufe of my Complaints. 

All Day I wander through the Groves, 

And fighing hear from ev'ry Tree 
The happy Birds chirping their Loves 5 

Happy, compar'd with lonely me. 
When gentle Sleep with balmy Wings, 

To reft fans ev'ry weary'd Wight, 
A thoufand Fears my Fancy brings, 

That keep me watching all the Night.' 



Sleep flies, while like the Goddefs fair, 
And all the Graces in her Train, 



SRtS 



1 1 lien abfent from the, Nymph ILove 



A Vhen ablentfromthe Njmpkl Love, I'd fain ittak.< 

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Orpheus Caledqnius. 55 

With melting Smiles and killing Air 

Appears the Caufe of ail my Pain. 
A while my Mind delighted flies, 

O'er all her Sweets with thrilling Joy 5 
Whilft want of Worth makes Doubts arife, 

That all my trembling Hopes deftroy, 

Thus while my Thoughts are nYd on her, 

I'm all o'er Tranfport and Defire; 
My Pulfe beats high, my Cheeks appear 

All Rofes, and mine Eyes all Fire. 
When to my felf I turn my View, 

My Veins grow chill, my Cheeks look wan 5 
Thus whilft my Fears my Pains renew, 

J fcarcely look or move a Man. 




XXIII, 



._.■»" 



56 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




XXIII. 

For ever y Fortune, wilt thou prove* 

FO B, ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove, 
An unrelenting Foe to Love ? 
And when we meet a mutual Heart, 
Come in between, and bid us part ? 
Bid us figh on from Day to Day, 
And wifh, and wifhthe Soul away ; 
Till Youth and genial Years are flown, 
And all the Life of Life is gone. 

But bufy, bufy ftill art thou,^ 
To bind the lovelefs, joylefs Vow; 
The Heart from Pleafure to delude, 
And join the Gentle to the Rude. 
For once, O Fortune, hear my Prayer, 
And I abfolve thy future Care ; 
All other Blcffings I refign, 
Make but the dear Amanda mine. 



m 



XXIY. 



I . 



23 

Logan Water 

IV 'i : h 



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57 




XXIV. 
The bon7ueJi Lafs in a the Warld. 

IOOK where my dear Hamillta fmiles, 
_j Hamillia ! heavenly Charmer j 
See how with all their Arts and Wiles, 

The Loves and Graces arm her. 
A Blum dwells glowing on her Cheeks, 

Fair Seats of youthful Pleasures; 
There Love in fmiling Language fpeaks, 
There fpreads his rofy Treafures. 

O faireft Maid, I own thy Power, 

I gaze, I figh and languifh, 
Yet ever, ever will adore, 

And triumph in my Anguifh. 
But eafe, O Charmer, eafe my Care, 

And let my Torments move thee 5 
As thou art faireft of the Fair, 

So I the deareft love thee. 



Vol. II. 



xxv a 



58 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



XXV. 

Clout the Caldro72. 



HAVE you any Pots or Pans, 
Or any broken Chandlers? 
I am a Tinkler to my Trade, 

And newly come frae Flanders. 
As fcant of Siller as of Grace ; 

Disbanded, we've a bad-run ; | 
Gar tell the Lady of the Place, 

I'm come to clout her Caldron. 
Fa adrze, dzdle 3 didle y &c. 

Madam, if you have Wark for me, 

I'll do't to your Contentment, 
And dinna care a fingle Flie 

For any Man's Refentment : 
For, Lady fair, tho* I appear, 

To every ane a Tinkler $ 
Yet to your fell I'm bauld to tell, 

I am a gentle Jinker. 
Fa adrze, didle^ dzdle } &c. 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 59 

Love Jupiter into a Swan 

Turn'd, for his lovely Leda; 
He like a Bull o'er Meadows ran, 

To ca,rry aff Europa. 
Then may not I, as well as he, 

To cheat yom Ar go s blinker, 
And win your Love like mighty Jove y 

Thus hide me in a Tinkler. 
Fa adrie, didle, didle> &c. 

Sir, ye appear a cunning Man, 

But this fine Plot you'll fail in ; 
For there is neither Pot nor Pan 

Of mine, you'll drive a Nail in. 
Then bind your Budget on your Back, 

And Nails up in your Apron i 
For I've a Tinkler under Tack, 

That's us'd to clout my Caldron. 
Fa adrie, didle, didle, &c. 




I % XXVI. 



6o Orpheus Caledoni 



us. 




XXVI. 

Willy was a wanton Wag. 

WILLT was a wanton Wag, 
The blytheft Lad that e'er I faw, 
At Bridals ftill he bore the Brag, 
And carried ay the Gree awa 9 : 
His Doublet was of Zetland Shag, 

And wow ! but IVilly he was braw, 
And at his Shoulder hang a Tag, 
That pleas'd the Lailes bell of a\ 

He was a Man without a Clag, 

His Heart was frank without a Flaws 
And ay whatever Willy faid, 

It was ftill hadden as a Law. 
His Boots they were made of the Jag, 

When he went to the Weapon- fhaw, 
Upon the green nane durft him brag, 

The feind a ane amang them a\ 

And was not Willy well worth Gowd \ 
He wan the Love of great andfma' \ 



For 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 61 

For after he the Bride had kifs'd, 

He kifs'd the Lafies hale fale a\ 
Sae merrily round the Ring they row*d, 

When be the Hand he led them a', 
And Smack on Smack on them beftow'd, 

By virtue of a (landing Law. 

And was na Willy a great Lown, 

AslhyreaLickas e'er wasfeen? 
When he danc'd with the Lafifes round, 

The Bridegroom fpeer'd where he had been. 
Quoth Willy ^ Pve been at the Ring, 

With bobbing, faith, my Shanks are fair* 
Gae ca' your Bride and Maidens in, 

For Willy he dow do nae mair. 

Then reft ye, Willy, I'll gae out, 

And for a wee fill up the Ring \ 
But, Shame light on his fouple Snout, 

He wanted Willy's wanton Fling. 
Then ftraight he to the Bride did fare, 

Says, well's me on your bonny Face, 
With bobbing Willy's Shanks are fair, 

And I am come to fill his Place. 

Bridegroom, (he fays, you'll fpoii the Dance, 

And at the Ring you*ll ay be lag ; 
Unlefs like Willy ye advance 5 

(O ! Willy has a wanton Leg) 

For 



62 



Orpheus Caledomus. 



For we't he learns us a' to (leer, 

And formaft ay bears up the Ring 5 

We will find nae fie Dancing here, 
If we want Willy's wanton Fling, 




xxvir: 



o*7 

v_My jSoaer ILad&ie 




pB ^^ J; lu l 

>rSojzer Laddie is over the Sea and he willbrincGold^ 



^ 



5 



iS3 



AOfekNr yfl mjill'.l 1 1' 



| Money to me;md wnenne comes Hame he'll make me a 



m 



m 



m 



I tfff J'Ji.j l HfJ'JIc l tfl'c 



La^myBlefsinggai^wi my SogerLaddie.my dotghty 






J • j I N J • 



5 



H^V' X ' I [.iffrcfipi 1 . 



Laddie is handfome and Brave, and can as a & oger and 



BE 



in 



fc 



&& l Ctj I p & J . p l^EP^ 



L over b ehave;Tnre to his Country, to Love .he is 






i 






fbeady there's fewto compare wi'my Soger Laddie . 



\ _LLeau-y / Lner 

(gib 



f|J -j H i? 



. 



Orpheus Caledonius. 63 




XXVII. 

Soger Laddie* 

MY Soger Laddie 
Is over the Sea, 
And he will bring Gold 

And Money to me ; 
And when he comes hame, 
He'll make me a Lady, 
My Bleffing gang with 
My Soger Laddie. 

My doughty Laddie 

Is handfome and brave, 
And can as a Soger 

And Lover behave 5 
True to his Country, 

To Love he is fteady, 
There's few to compare 

With my Soger Laddie. 

Shield him, ye Angels, 

Frae I>eath in Alarms, 



Re- 



64 Orpheus Caledonius. 

Return him with Lawrels 

To my langing Arms. 
Syne frae all my Care 

Ye'll pleafantly free me, 
When back to my Wifhes 

My Soger ye gie me. 

O foon may his Honours 

Bloom fair on his Brow, 
As quickly they mud, 

If he get his due : 
For in noble A&ions, 

His Courage is ready, 
Which makes me delight 

In my Soger Laddie. 




sxvm; 



^8 




WKat Numbers fhallthe 2fl_ufe repeat: w-hair 



Wliat Numbers fhall the MxTfe repeat; w 

■#-4 — . L*=r 



b E i I r 



m 



m 



m 



i mm. t 1 ^^ 



"Verfe be found to praife my.Art7iie.'onher tenThoiiiand 



lm 



aiie my . 

an 



^g 



£3: 



x eraces wait e ach s wain admires. and owns ihe s b onnv. 



graces wait e ach s wain admires, and owns Ihe s b onny. 



g a pi i • r 



i 



^ 



i§ 



ft l ilttfMj JC lQj] J =gSP| 



SincefirftfhetrodethehapgyPlain^fheret each 



^ 



£ 



sps 



^ 



ft iim' 1 r ri rr 3^3 



s 



Yoiithfullheart on Fire y -each Nymnhdo es toiler swain conr 



3 



Hi 



* 



i 



* 



0.f>JCrJ1jj;j|i^^F 



_ plain that -Annie Idiidles new defire 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



65 



XXVIII. 
Allan Water-. 

WHAT Numbers fhall the Mufe repeat > 
What Verfe be found to praife my Annie i 
On her ten thoufand Graces wait* 

Each Swain admires, and owns {he's bonny* 
x Since firft flic trode the happy Plain, 

She fet each youthful Heart on fire j 
Each Nymph does to her Swain complain, 
That Annie kindles new Delire. 



Among the Crowd Amyntor came; 

He look'd, he lov'd, he bow'd to Annie $ 
Hisriftng Sighs exprefshis Flame, 

His Words were few, his Wifries many. 
With Smiles the lovely Maid reply'd, 

Kind Shepherd, why fhould I deceive ye ? 
Alas! your Love muft be deny'd, 

This deftin'd Bread can ne'er relieve ye» 

Young ^Damon came with Ctipid's Art, 

His Wiles, his Smiles, his Charms beguiling ; 



Vo £» I!, 



K 



Ui 



66 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



He dole away my Virgin Heart ; 

Ceafe, poor Amyntor, ceafe bewailing. 
Some brighter Beauty you may rind, 

On yonder Plain the Nymphs are many ; 
Then chufe fome Heart that's unconfin'd, 

And leave to T)amon his own Annie. 







XXIX. 



29 



:ou. 



Yoxing ThiLander \vot> 'd me lane ,Bxrt X -was 




I 



) una 



Philander 



A 



?rwm> 



mm 



\-4- 



i 



INN£ 



P¥ 



M 



rbadliiiivlwad^na tentiiis lov: 



— 



peeriili.andforba^luin^I-wrad^ia tentiiis lovin 



EK 



** 



^PPf* 



S 



/'J,j' i Ji)frf] | J.J'eij i if,ip^ 

•* Saii^BirtWwI^S^I'WklJiadmiii: lliMbrning 




m 



m 



clTT . r • r i r -T-- 



army Grlafs , then I perceive ray B eaiitv; 

I i I iwfrf i 



£0 



_ L \ __ • iTI '/-_• _ .1 C .J.1 



3E 



going ;-when the -wrinkles Xeize the £ ace, then 

rJl J • J i J=#=Hf 



*iii 



;/ r 'i ii Bg ''i 1 ^ 5 

3iaidsmay bid. a-dieii to -wooing. 



i 



Orpheus Caledoniu?. 



67 



XXIX. 
Peer of Leith. 

YOung 'Philander woo'd me lang, 
But I was pcevifh, and forbad him, 
I wadna tent his ioving Sang, 

But now I wifh, I wifh I had him : 
Ilk Morning when I view my Glafs, 
Then I perceive my Beauty going ; 
And when the Wrinkles feize the Face, 
Then we may bid adieu to wooing. 

My Beauty, anes fo much admir'd, 

I find it fading faft, and flying; 
My Cheeks, which Coral like appear'd, 

Grow pale, the broken Blood decaying: 
Ah! we may fee our felves to be, 

Like Summer Fruit that is unfhaken t 
When ripe, they foon fall down and die, 

And by Corruption quickly taken. 

Ufe then your Time, ye Virgins fair, 
Employ your Day before 'tis evil i 

K 2 



Fifteen 



68 



Orpheus Caledonius, 



Fifteen is a Seafon rare, 

But five and twenty is the Devil. 
Juft when ripe, content unto't, 

Hug nae mair your lanely Pillow : 
Women are like other Fruit, 

They lofe their Relifh when too mellow, 




XXX, 



A*it\ ■ 



% * 






at 



50 



So the Tune of BES/$Y$ Haaaies 



m ! j j] j 1 up ^ 



Befsv's Beaiitiesfhinefae ^bright, were Jb.er 



^F^ 



i 



l 



* 



(j 



s 



v^ 



*=*J 



many virtues fewer, £>he wad ever <give delight, 



m 



ppi p 



w 



;'ji' 1 11 if 



m 



# — * 



ancLLn Tranfport make me view her. B onny 



as 



lcl oil ira] 



i 



* 



^ 



I J3ejsyjth.ee alane, Love I, nathing elfe about-tJb.ee 



I 



E=f5iE3J 



rtJlOlJ 1 [fifty, ? 



#=^ 



fS 



with thy comelinefs I'm tane, and langer cannot 

p f f 



± 



P 



F^Nl 



-j- ♦-»-«" 



B > > 



live without thee. 



s 



g 



Orpheus Caledonius. 






aaX.. 

BefTy'j' Haggles. 

BEjJy's Beauties fhinc fae bright, 
Were her many Virtues fewer. 
She wad ever give Delight, 

And in Tranfport make me view her. 
Bonny BeJJy, thee alane 

Love I, naithing elfe about thee ; 
With thy Comelinefs I'm tane, 
And lander cannot live without thee. 



■£»' 



Bejffs Bofom's faft and warm, 

Milk-white Fingers flill cmploy'd* 
He who takes her to his Arm, 

Of her Sweets can ne'er be cloy'd. 
M y dear B(J/}> when the Roles 

Leave thy Cheek, as thou grows aulder, 
Virtue, which thy Mind difclofcs, 

Will keep Love frae growing caulder. 

Beffy's Tocher is but fcanty, 
Yet her Face and Soul difcovers 



Thefo 



70 Orpheus Caledonius, 

Thefe inchanting Sweets in plenty, 
Mutt intice a thoufand Lovers. 

It's not Money, but a Woman 
Of a Temper kind and eafy, 

That gives Happinefs uncommon, 
Petted things can nought but tecz ye. 




XXXI. 



* 



Jo the Trme of I fix d my Fancy on her 



ix a my 



m wm m 



*=c 






Bright Cynthia's powr divinely great .what 



:v f i 'i 'i 11 i i 



* 



J-ff[f [jj{ffjiJ n& m 



I 



=2 



heart is not obeying • A^ thoiiland Cu-pids onher 



^^ 



ppg 



* 



in 



afe 



& 



idinh.er£"vnes ar 



fi t 



» 



£ 



s 



wait and in her Eyes are playing . fhe Teems the 



33 



^^ 



& 



j^rc r trirT Epj 



^p 



Queen of Xoveto reien;for£he alone difpence^ 



s r B r r [ fii r f u l 'r ' 






IP 



-s iuchlweets as beft can entertain, the Guft o£ 



f J' i ■ 



sue 



psa 



fMf P i t r ;r li- 



te 



c 



all the senfes . 



PPi 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



7i 



XXXI. 
Bright CynthiaV Power. 

B Right Cynthia's Power divinely great, 
What Heart is not obeying ? 
A thoufand Cupids on her wait, 
And in her Eyes are playing. 
She feems the Queen of Love to reign 
For fhe alone difpenfes 
Such Sweets, as bed can entertain 
The Guft of all the Senfes. 



■ 



Her Face a charming Profpcd brings, 
Her Breath gives balmy BlifTes ; 
I hear an Angel when (he fings, 
And talk of Heaven in Kifles. 
Four Senfes thus fhe fe aft s with Joy, 
From Nature's richeft Treafure : 
Let me the other Senfe employ, 
And I (hall die with pleafure. 




XXXII. 



7'z 



Orpheus Caledonius, 



U- ■■■' v* ' -]'< ! > ••--■■ */£*■ - 1 l a • — -V- -v. wf"-(J 



XXXIL 
72 /V « ;^ /?z/W £/Vz Houfe* 



t ~jr \ \{\ S is not mine ain Houfe, 
I ken by the Rigging oi; 
Since with my Love I've changed Vows* 

I dinna like the Bilging o't. 
For now that I'm young Robies Bride* 
And M iftrefs of his Fire-fide, 
Mine ain Houfe I'll like to guide, 

And pleafe me with the Trigging on't. 

Then farewell to my Father's Houfe, 

I gang where Love invites me j 
The drifted Duty this allows, 

When Love with Honour meets me* 
When Hymen moulds us into ane, 
My Robie's nearer than my Kin, 
And to refufe him were a Sin, 
Sae lang's he kindly treats me, 

When I'm in mine ain Houfe, 
True Love mail be at hand ay* 



'01 






.32, . __ 
is is no miTie ain xLouCe 



Sgfe 



J: 



I ken frvrthc 



i 



And this is no mine ain Hoirfe,! ken by the 



P3 



* 




g | i, J 1 1 | J' J 1 pimm 



In 



Bigging o't t Since with my Love I changclvows,! 



m 



$ 



dinnalike the Bier cine ot for now that Imvotiii s 



m 



dinna like the Biggine ot, for now that IrrryDirng 



I 



* 



^ 



f 



M~t : m f ' ' J'N 'H' H 



Robie's Bride, and ^Mifbrefs of his Fire-fide mine 



B^ 



m 



^ 



* 



^-^ W L ^ j J' j 1 J 

ain Honfe 111 like to euid, and nleafemewithv 



B 



f 






trigging o't« 



¥ 



Orpheus Caledonius. 

To make me (till a prudent Spoufe, 
And let my Man command fay 5 
Avoiding ilka Caufe of Strife, 
The common Peft of married Life, 
That makes ane wearied of his Wife, 
And breaks the kindly Band ay. 



73 




Vol.il 



B 



xxxnr; 



74 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




XXXIIL 
Why hangs that Cloud. 

H Y hangs that Cloud upon thy Brow ? 

That beauteous Heav'n e'er while ferent t 
Whence do rhefe Storms and Tempcfts flow, 
Or what this Guft of Paffion mean ? 
And muft then Mankind lofe that Light, 
Which in thine Eyes was wont to fhine, 
And lie obfeur'd in endlefs Night, 
For each poor filly Speech of mine ? 

Dear Child, how can I wrong thy Name, 
Since 'tis acknowledg'd at all hands, 
That could ill Tongues abufe thy Fame, 
Thy Beauty can make large Amends : 
Orif Idurft profanely try, 
Thy Beauty's powerful Charms t'upbraid, 
Thy Virtue well might give the Lye, 

Nor call thy Beauty to its Aid. 



For Venus every Heart t'enfnare, 

With all her Charms has deckt thy Face 5 



And: 



j 



r 



33 



zjo the Twie of Hallow Hen 







At 



a 



& 



. langs that Cloud upon thy Erow! that 



3 



§ 



si 



^3= 



P T> x TJ™H_ ' . .1, ♦ 1 'r> 1™5 J^ 4-U^-Ha 



Beauteous Heavh e'er while ferene, whence do thefe 



t 



i 



* 



:ms andtempeftsfloworwhatthis sraftorPaisiorj 



ftorms andtempeftsfloworwhatthis zxiftorPalsion 



I ftoi 

m 

> 



p i^fiff^fij ^ 



fg ar i cr r c Lfrr i ^c r n 



me an And imiftthen Mankind lofe that li^twhich 

g -o — 



spi 



i£ 



^ 



j -C fpj j l l fl J r f feP # 



'£ve! 



in thine Eye s were wont to £hine,and lye obfcur cl an 



frf l J i I J r tt 



w 

urct 



mm 



pH r^rr eg r f ' f H i * 



encUefsnj^kbforeacnpaorJllly speech, of mine 



SB 



t 



sisni^n^roreacnpoDrliliv speecn or mine . 

j^Frittfrnn i in...-. 



Orpheus Caledonius. 

And Tallas with unufual Care, 
Bids Wifdom heighten every Grace. 
Who can the double Pain endure ? 
Or who mud not refign the Field 
To thee, celeflial Maid, fecure 
With Cupid's Bow and T alias' Shield ? 

If then to thee fuch Power is given, 
Let not a Wretch in Torment live, 
But fmile, and learn to copy Heaven, 
Since we muft fin e'er it forgive. 
'Yet pitying Heaven not only docs 
Forgive th' Offender and th' Offence, 
But even itfelf appeas'd bellows, 
As the Reward of Penitence. 



75 




L i 



XXXIV. 



7 6 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



^S$fi9®fii 



)b 



XXXIV. 
Patie and Peggy. 

Pat ie. 

BY the delicious Warmnefs of thy Mouth, 
And rowing Eye, which fmiling tells the 
Truth, 
I guefs, my Laflie, that as well as I, 
You're made for Love, and why fhould ye deny ? 

Peggy. 
But ken ye, Lad, gin we confefs o'er foon, 
Ye think us cheap, and fyne the Wooing's done : 
The Maiden that o'er quickly tines her Pow'r, 
Like unripe Fruit, will tafte but hard and four. 

Patie. 

But when they hing o'er hng upon the Tree, 
Their Swectnefs they may tine, and fae may ye : 
Red-cheeked you compleatly ripe appear, 
And I have thol'd and woo'd a lang haff Year. 

Peggy. 

Then dinna pu' me ; gently thus I fa* 

Into my Tatie's Arms for good and a' : 

Bu£ 




«Mte 



PATIE arc^'PEGGY 




^g 



jjfei 



By the cklicioiis warmnefs ox tlry month and, 



ii 



f— £ 



fVn g J ■Turrit j p 

rowme Eve which smilinc tells tke Truth, I 



rawing Eye,which smiling tells the Truth 



/'"' Mij. i Hi r-j jx j 




.T| f ni|. c mJ)j.j, ^p 



ehs 



gnefs my Lafsie,that as well as I voifre made for 



: eis my ,balsie,tnat as well as lvonre maae i 



£ 



j i hi i.uiiu ! i 'I i i 



i 



E 



» 



Love andwlnr and why fhonld yon deny.' But kenye 



ana wav, ai 

mm 



if ii 




jff f r^r-r- i rrfB rc | jp § g 

L ad when we confefs o' er £ Jron^e thlnkirs cheapo 






£ 



£±fc 



a* 



pi r r'-^ir-f.f-fMrrffliir'H 

•* ^L_L - i_T _• " ) 3 1 j.1 1 "- I*- 'J i.LT.1. _'« ' W-U 



fyne the woaines ddne:the ^Maiden that o'er quickly 




■ fiJ-^ttf" 



jT' im ). j 'IJ j m +^-H^. 



ffiffi 



gg 



tines lierPowr, like unripe PnTitAvilltafbe.will 



^K 



PJJP 



^ 




S 



i 



i ■ i ■ i 



taixe Jbtrt Jhi-arcL ani Scrwr, 



r j 3 ii ' ' ^ 



Fo rthe German Flu te 



/'H l ff[fjfUjJ["f^^ 



J' 1 1 1 lluji i i rii ^ i f ijlff 
/'ujitiiiu/nriiiiLirrT 1 



." f'if r i | f f ' i if u ii fi ii iu' f , f 







Orpheus Caledonius. 

But flint your Wifhes to this frank Embrace,, 
And mint nae farther till we've got the Grace. 

Pat te. 

O charming Armsfu' ! hence, ye Cares, away, 
I'll kits my Treafure a' the live-lang Day : 
A* Night I'll dream my KifTes o'er again, 
'Till that Day come that yc'llbe a' my ain, 



77 




XXXV. 



8 Orpheus Ca led oni us. 



XXXV. 
7%e bonny Lafs of Brankfbme, 

AS I came in by Tiviot-fide, 
And by the Braes of Brankfome, 
There firft I faw my bonny Bride, 

Young, fmiling, fweet and handfome : 
Her Skin was fafter than the Down, 

And white as Alabafter 5 
Her Hair a fhining wavy brown ; 
In ftraightnefs nane furpaft her. 

Life glovv'd upon her Lip and Cheek, 

Her clear Een were furprifing, 
And beautifully turn'd her Neck, 

Her little Breads juft rifing : 
Nae filken Hofe, with Goofhets fine, 

Or Shoon with glancing Laces, 
On her fair Leg, forbad to fhine, 

Well fhapen native Graces. 

Ae little Coat, and Bodice white, 
Was fum of a' her Claithing ; 



Even 



j 



Uke Sonny LaCs of BrankCome 



As I came in hy Tiviot fide rand by thi 



" ■ c i 



m 



» 



m 



P 



fe 



i 



itHS 



Braes of BrankTome, there I Irffc J^aw my boiniy 



il 



i 



i 



SPP 



Pf 



fTr^l Tj ^ ^ 



i 



Bride youne, Smiling - sweet and Jh.andfbme;iier 







Simwas f after than the Down and wl 



pa r rJ f a 



^^ 



/f i M i fT't i i jij P i r n i 11 



t5 W 



Alarbla titer- her hair a fhining wayy-Brown^n 



3 



•own 

a 



s 



pp 



^ 



m J. T [r'fl 

i ftraifchtnefs nS.n.e fn 



^ 



f traightnefs nane furpaft her 




ii I ' .... 



^p 



Orpheus Caledonius. 79 

Even thefe o'er mickle ; ■ mair Dclyte 

She'd given cled wi' naithing. 
She lean'd upon a flowry Brae, 

By which a Burn y trotted : 
On her I glowr'd my Saul away, 

While on her Sweets I doated. 

A thoufand Beauties of Defert, 

Before had fcarce alarm'd me, 
Till this dear Artlefs (truck my Heart, 

And bot designing, charm'd me. 
Hurry'd by Love clofe to my Bread, 

I grafp'd the Fund of Bliffes ; 
Wha fmil'd, and faid, without a Priefr, 

Sir, hope for nought but Kifl.es. 

I had nae Heart to do her Harm, 

And yet I coudna want her ; 
What flic demanded, ilka Charm 

Of her's pled, I mould grant her, 
Since Heaven had dealt to me a routh, 

Straight to the Kirk I led her, 
There plighted her my Faith and Trowth, 

And a young Lady made her. 



s&m 



XXXVI. 



8o 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




XXXVI. 
My Jo Janet. 

SWeet Sir, for your Courtefie, 
When yc come by the Bafs then, 
For the Love ye bear to mc, 

Buy me a Keeking-Glafs then. 
Keek into the Draw-well, 

Janet, Janet ; 
AndthereyeHlfeeye'r bonny fell, 
My Jo Janet. 

Keeking in the Draw-well clear, 

Wat if I fhou d fa' in, 
Syne a' my Kin will fay and fwear, 

I drown'd my fell for Sin. 
Had the better be the Brae, 

Janet, Janet; 
Had the better be the Brae, 
My Jo Janet. 

Good Sir, for your Courtefie; 
Coming through Aberdeen then; 



tor 



3£ 

QyVEy jo JxiLet 






j | | I, I, . I, g f, fr*ffrHT? 



$weet £ir y for your Coirrteile / wh.eiT ; yecoTneby-y 



^s 



i 



P^ 



£ 



vr 



P^Fe 



m 



* 



BE i I I b 



5<z/j then^for the Love ye bear to me, buy 



^ 



! 



I f, f, j ) 1 H g |^ 



me a Ke eking Glafs then, ifec^ into the Draw TV ell 



m 



mm 



5 



r 



* 



a ! j j 1 ii 



P h J^ 5 



x Janet y Janet «7t^ there ye'Ujee ije'r bonny scll y 

Nr ^ r i r f r f 



f /*j] i j i ii. 



imy<J° Janet . 



WE 



Vr 



#=^ 



I 



m 



Orpheus Caledonius. 8i 

for the Love ye bear to me, 

Buy me a Pair of Shoon then. 
Clout the auld, the new are dear, 

Janet, Janet, 
Aepair may gain ye haffa Tear, 
My Jo Janet. 

But what if dancing on the Green, 

And skipping like a Mawking, 
If they fhou'd fee my clouted Shoon, 

Of me they will be tauking. 
'Dance ay laigh, and late at E'en, 

Janet, Janet, 
Syne a their Fauts will no be feen. 
My Jo ]znct. 

Kind Sir, for your Courtefic, 

When ye gae to the Giofs then, 
For trie Love ye bear to me, 

Buy me a pacing Horie then. 
'Pace upo your Spinning-wheel, 

Janet, Janet ; 
Pace upd your Spinning-wheel, 
My yfljanet. 

My Spinning-wheel is auld and ftiff, 
The Rock o't winna ftand, Sir, 

Vol. IL M To 



82 



RPHEUS CaLEDONIUS. 



To keep the Temper-pin in tiff, 

Employs aft my Hand, Sir. 
Make the befi d't that you can y 

Janet, Janet ; 
But like it never wale a Man, 

My Jo Janet, 




IXXVIL 



Jo the Tune of oenny "begrrilii th-eAVebftex 



( /iaujnnn\it\. i, 



O Mither dear I 'gintofeartWImbaithgoodW 



g gr 



i 



^ 



5 



tt 






33 ony I winna keep;f or in my sle epjflart tfcdreamof 



£ 



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dfohmi.vfceivJohjiy then conies down, the Glen, to 



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wcro me dinna tinder- butwi content ei v confentfor 



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we twa ne'er can Tinder . 



g 



v 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



S3 



*S**Ss2«S<i~ji& : 'u£.'S 



XXXVII. 
Mither dear, I gin to fear. 




Mither dear, I 'gin to fear, 
Tho' I'm baith good, and bonny, 
1 winna keep ; for id my Sleep 

I Mart and dream otjohny. 
Whznjohny then comes down the Glen, 

To woo me, dinna hinder 5 
Bin with Content gi' your Confentj 
For we twa ne'er can iindcr. 



Better to marry, than mifcarry 5 

For Shame and Skaith's the Clink o'r, 
To thole the Dool, to mount the Stool, 

I downa' bide to think o't : 
Sae while 'tis time, Til (hun the Crime, 

That gars poor Epps gae whinging, 
With Hainches fow, and Ecn fae blew, 

To a the Bedrals bindging. 

Had Eppfs Apron bidden down, 
The Kirk had ne'er a kend it > 

M 2 



But 



84 Orpheus Caledonius. 

But when the Word's gane thro' the Town, 

Alake ! how can (he mend it ? 
Now Tarn maun face the Minifter, 

And fhe maun mount the Pillar j 
And that's the way that they maun gae, 

For poor Folk has na Siller. 

Now ha'd ye'r Tongue, my Daughter young, 

Reply'd the kindly Mither, 
Goxjohnyh Hand in haly Band, 

Syne wap ye'r Wealth together. 
I'm o* the mind, ifheb>ekind, 

Ye'll do your part difcreetly 5 
And prove a Wife, will gar his Life, 

And Barrel run right fweetly. 




XXXVIII. 



ohe Country Jafs , 

X J A" tko' r b e but a CoTmtr\rL afs A lofhrmind I 



-AS-tko^be biit a Coirntry-L'afs, A lofty mind I 



'^r i r-'-frrnr ^ftf i r \ \ 



( &f flr-hl ij lj 

> ' bdar- -O. rtkiik'mv-re 



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bear.-O, I^kinJcmyTell as good as tkofe that 



rt j i ■ , wi > ■ tfLr I 



ricJh. apparel wear.-OTAitKo ) iTiyGowii be 




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hame fpxrn Grray^iriy- skin, it is as safL ,_0, as 



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4s 



them that $attin Weeds do wear, and 



p 



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carrrr their Heads alaft--- 



^m 



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il 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



85 




XXXVIII. 
Tie Country Lafs. 

ALtho' I be but a Country Lais, 
Yet a lofty Mind I bear— O, 
And think my fell as good as thofe, 

That rich Apparel wear — O. 
Altho' my Gown be hame-fpun Gray, 

My Skin it is as faft — O, 
As them that Satin Weeds do wear, 
And carry their heads alaft — O. 

What tho' I keep my Father's Sheep ? 

The thing that mult be done — O, 
With Garlands of the fineft Flowers, 

To fhademefrae the Sun — O. 
When they are feeding pleafantly, 

Where Grafs and Flowers do fpring —* O, 
Then on a Flowry Bank at Noon, 

I fet me down and Ting — : O. 



My 



86 Orpheus Caledonius. 

My c PaiJly Piggy, cork'd with Sage, 

Contains my Drink but thin — O : 
No Wines do e'er my Brain enrage, 

Or tempt my Mind to fin — Oj 
My Country Curds, and wooden Spoon, 

I think them unco fine — O ; 
And on a flowry Bank at Noon, 

I fet me down and dine — O. 

Altho' my Parents cannot raife 

Great Bags of mining Gold — O, 
Like them whafe Daughters, now-a-days, 

Like Swine are bought and fold — Oj 
Yet my fair Body it fball keep 

An honeft Heart within — O, 
And for twice fifty thoufand Crowns, 

I value not a Prin — O. 

I ufe nae Gums upon my Hair, 

Nor Chains about my Neck — O, 
Nor mining Ringtf up'on my Hands, 

My Fingers ftraight to deck — O j 
But for that Lad to me fhall fa', 

And I have Grace to wed — O, 
I'll keep a Jewel worth them a', 

I mean my Maidenhead — O. 

If canny Fortune give to me, 
The Man I dearly love -^ O, 



Tho' 



Orpheus Caledonius. 
Tho* we want Gear, I dinna care 

My Hands I can improve O • 

Expecting for a BleiUng ftill, 

Defending from above — O 
Then we'll embrace and fweetly kifs, 

Repeating Tales of Love — O. 



8 7 




XXXDC 



88 Orpheus Caledonius. 







XXXIX. 

To the Tune of, 
Come kifs with me y come ckp with me, 

Peggy. 
Y Jocky blyth for what thou haft done, 
There is nae help nor mending 5 
Por thou has jogg'd me out of Tune, 

For a' thy fair pretending. 
My Mither fees a Change on me, 

For my Complexion dailies, 
And this alas ! has been with thee, 
Sae late amang the Rallies. 

Jocky. 

My Teggy, what I've faid I'll do, 

To free thee frae her Scouling j 
Come then, and let us buckle to, 

Nae langer let's be fooling : 
For her Content I'll inftant wed, 

Since thy Complexion dafhes ; 
'And then we'll try a Feather-bed, 

'Tis fafter than the Rallies. 

Peggjt; 






rjothe Lime o/; Come Hfs with, me, come clap with me. 



^iLi \ 1 1 1 m 



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is nae 



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is nae help nor mending;fbr thou haft jog'd me 



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out o£ Tim^for a thy fair pretending . -My 



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hran ~ — 1 — m 



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dalh.es and this alafs.'has been with, tin 



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late amang th.e Ttafh.es 



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^ 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



81 



Peggy. 
Then Jocky fince thy Love's fo true, 

Let Mither fcoul, I'm cafy : 
Sae lang's I live I ne'er (hall rue 

For what I've done to pleafe thee, 
And there's my hand I'le ne'er complain 

O ! well's me on the Rafhes ; 
When e'er thou likes Plldo't again, 

And a Feg for a'their Clafhes. 




y©L. ii. 



n 



xt: 



go 



Orpheus Caledonius. 




Hero and Leander, an Old Ballad, 

LEander on the Bay 
Of Hellefpont, all naked flood j 
Impatient of Delay, 
He leap'd into the fatal Flood : 
The raging Seas 
(Whom none can pleafe) 
'Gainft him their Malice fhew s 
The Heav'ns lour'd, 
The Rain down pour'd, 
And loud the Winds did blow. 



Then calling round his Eyes, 
Thus of his Fate he did complain : 
Ye cruel Rocks and Skies ! 
Ye ftormy Winds and angry Main ! 

What 'tis to mifs 

The Lover's Blifs ; 

Alas ! < ye do not know ; 

Make me your Wreck, 
As I come back, 
But f pare me — • as I go. 



Lo» 



40 



SLo 



Hero and X<eancler 



IV 




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oleander on the JBay y of Helefpont, all 



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2^aked rtaod Impatient o£ de-lay; lie 



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le apt into the Fatal P lcro d: the Raging seaswnom 



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none canPleafe 'gainft -him tneir MaTLice 



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l 1 " f tf f r f I n 1 i I 



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Rowr'd andloird the "winds did blow. 

si 



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*-*■*- 






Orpheus Caledonius. gi 

Lo ! yonder (lands the Tow'r! 

Where my beloved Hero lies j 

And this th' appointed Hour, 

Which fets to watch her longing Eyes : 

To his fond Suit, 

The Gods were mute, 
The Billows anfwcr'd No! 

Up to the Skies 

The Surges rife s 
But funk the Youth as low. 

Mean while the wiihing Maid, 
Divided 'twixt her Care and Love ; 
Now docs his Stay upbraid, 
Now dreads he fhou'd the Paflage prove, 

O Fate ! ■ laid (he, 

Nor Heav'n, nor thee, 
Our Vows (hall e'er divide : 

I'd leap this Wall, 

Cou'd I but fall, 
By my Leander** Side. 

At length the riling Sun 

Did to her Sight reveal too late, ' 

That Hero was undone. 

Not by Leanders Fault, but Fate : 

Saidfhe, I'll (hew, 

Tho' we are two, 

N 2 Our 



9 2 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



Our Loves were ever one ; 

This Proof I'll give, 

I will not live, 
Nor fliall he die alone. 

Down from the Wall fhe leapt 
Into the raging Seas to him, 
Courting each Wave fhe met, 
To teach her wearied Arms to fwim : 

The Sea-Gods wept, 

Nor longer kept 
Her from her Lover's Side ; 

When join'd at laft, 

She grafp'd him faft, 
Then figh'd, embrac'd, and dy'd. 




XLI. 



Todlen JButt and Todlen IB en 

i fo j l m [, \ f. 1 1 1 r I 1 



I "WKenlVe a Sixpence xriider my thumb, then 




Orpheus Caledonius. 



93 




XLI. 

Tod!e7i butt) and Todlen hen* 

WHen I've a Saxpence under my Thumb, 
Then 1 get Credit in ilka Town : 
But ay when I'm poor they bid me gang by* 
O ! Poverty parts good Company. 
Todlen hame, todlen hame, 
Coudna my Love come todlen hame. 

Fair-fa' the Good wife, and fend her good Sale, 
She gi'es us white Bannocks to drink her Ale, 
Syne if that her Tippony chance to be una*, 
We'll tak a good Scour o't, and cat awa\ 
Todlen hame, todlen hame, 
As round as a Keep come todlen hame. 

My Kimmer and I lay down to fleep, 
And twa Pint-ftoups at our Bed's Feet ; 
And ay when we waken'd, we drank them dry : 
What think ye of my wee Kimmer and I ? 

Todlen butt, and todlen ben, 

Sae round as my Love comes todlen hame* 

Lees 



/ 



94 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



Lecz me on Liquor, mytodlen Dow, 
Ye're ay fac good humour'd when weeting'yourMou; 
When fober fae four, ye'll fight with a Flee, 
That 'tis a blyth Sight to the Bairns and me. 
When todlen hame? todlen hame, 
When round as a Keep ye come todlen hame. 




XLIL 



Ulie Glancina of her <ylpron 




j'f, 1'IJ'H I. 



IPS 



XL 



In tycuiuary laft, On 3£TrnbncLay at 



f J I f ' r l 



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J£orn, as tkroiigh- tke Fields I -p aft, to 



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V- 




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p — w 



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IX 



"view tne winter C!orn.I looted me beliind,an£ 



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faw came o'er tne If now, ane. Glancing in ner 



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-Apror^witn a - bonny brent Brow. 



**kQ-~n 



jj 5 || I j j E ^" 



Orpheus Caledonius. 



95 




XLII. 

The Glancing of her Apron, 

IN January laft, 
On Munanday at Morn, 
As through the fields I paft, 
To view the Winter Corn, 
I looked me behind, 

And faw come o'er the Know, 
Ane glancing in her Apron, 
With a bonny brent Brow. 

Ifaid, good morrow, fair Maid 5 

And fhe right courteoufly 
Return'd a Beck, and kindly faid , 

Good Day, fweet Sir y to you. 
I fpear'd, my dear, how far awa' 

Do ye intend to gae. 
Quoth fhe, I mean a Mile or twa, 

Out o'er yon broomy Brae. 

He. 

Fair Maid, I'm thankfu to my fate 3 
[To have fie Company $ 



for 



n 



96 Orpheus Caledonius. 

For I am ganging ftraight that Gate, 

Where ye intend to be. 
When we had gane a Mile or twain, 

1 laid to her, my Dow, 
May we not lean us on this Plain, 

And kifs your bonny Mou. 

She. 
Kind Sir, ye are a wi' miftane; 

For I am nane of thefe, 
I hope ye fome mair breeding ken, 

Than to ruffle Woman's Claife : 
For may be I have chofen ane, 

And plighted him my Vow, 
Wha may do wi' me what he likes, 

And kifs my bonny Mou. 

He. 
Ka, if ye are contracted, 

I hae nae mair to fay : 
Rather than be rejected, 

I will gie o'er the Play 5 
And chufe anither will refped 

My Love, and on me rew* 
And let me clafp her round the Neck. 

And kifs her bonny Mou. 



Shi 



Orpheus Caledo 



N I U S. 



97 



She. 
D Sirj ye arc proud-hearted, 

And laith to be faid nay, 
Elfe ye wad ne'er a ftarted 

For ought that I did fay : 
For Women in their Modefty 

At firft they winna bow ; 
But if we like your Company, 

We'll prove as kind as you, 




Vol. II. 



O 



XLIII, 



,8 



Orpheus CaledonIus. 



XLIII. 
The Birks of Endermay. 

T^HE fmiling Morn, the breathing Spring, 
Invite the tuneful Birds to fing : 
And while they warble from each Spray, 
Love melts the universal Lay. 
Let us, Amanda? timely wife, 
Like them improve the Hour that flies 5 
And in foft Raptures wafte the Day, 
Among the Birks of Endermay. 

For fobn the Winter of the Year, 
And Age, Life's Winter, will appear t 
At this, thy living Bloom will fade 5 
As that will flrip the verdant Shade. 
Our Tafte of Pleafure then is o'er ; 
The feather'd Songfters love no more : 
And when they droop, and we decay* 
Adieu the Birks of Endermay. 



<§i 



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saps 



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me tuneful Birds to line: and while the^ 



-~v±te tne tuneful Birds to ling: and while the 



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irblefroni each ibrairLove melts tne IJnhrerfalla 



. ^warble from each Jhraj^Love melts tKe Tlnxverfallay: 



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Let tts AmaiidcL^jsri^jf wife, like taemimproi 



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rr tEatfL-y-s, and infoft raptures wafte theDay; a: 



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44. 
MILLIE WTNXIES TePtament 



jHHf]Jflfi) L i ).[,if \ft\ < \ 



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Orpheus Caledonius. 09 



XLIV. 
Willie Winkie 's Tejiament. 

MY Daddy left me Gear enough, 
A Couter and an auld Beam-plough, 
A nebbed Staff, a Nutting-tyne, 
A Fifhing-wand with Huik and Line. 
With twa auld Stools and a Dirt-houfe, 
A Jerkinet fcarce worth a Loufe ; 
An auld Patt, that wants the Lug, 
A Spuitle and a fowen Mug. 

A Hempen Heckle, and a Mel!, 
A Tarr-horn, and a Weather's Bell, 
A Muck-fork, and an auld Peet- creel, 
The Spairks of our auld Spinning-wheel, 
A Pair of Branks, yea and a Sadie, 
With our auld brunt and broken Ladle; 
A Whang-bitt and a Sniffle- bit ; 
Chear up, my Bairns, and dance a fit. 

A ,Flailing-itaff, a Timmer Spcef, 
An auld Kirn and a Hole in it, 

. O 2 Yearn. 



ioo Orpheus Caledonius. 

Yearn-winnles, and a Reel, 
A Fetter-lock, a Trump of Steel, 
A Whifle, and aToup-horn Spoon, 
With an auld Pair of clouted Shoon > 
A Timmer Spade, and a Gleg Shear, 
A Bonnet for my Bairns to wear, 

A Timmer Tong, a broken Cradle, 
The Pillion of an auld Car-Sadie, 
A Gullie-knife, and a Horfe-wand, 
A Mitten for the Left-hand 5 
With an auld broken Pan of Brafs, 
With an auld Sark that wants the arfe % 
An auld Band, and a Hooding-How* 
I hope (my Bairns) ye're a* well now, 

Oft have I born yc -on my Back, 
With a' this RifF-rafF in my Pack 5 
And it was a' for want of Gear, 
That gart me (teal Mefs John's gray Marc: 
But now, my Bairns, what ails ye now, 
por ye ha'e Naigs enough to plough 5 
And Hole and Shoon fit for your Feet, 
Chear up, my Bairns, and dinna greet 

Then with my fel I did advife, 
My Daddy's Gear for to comprize 5 
Some Neighbours I ca'd in to fee ? 
What Gear my Daddy left to me< 



The£ 






Orpheus Caledonius, 

They fat three quarters of a Year, 
Comprising of my Daddy's Gear ; 
And when they had gi'en a* their Votes, 
? Twas fcarccly a' worth four Pounds Sf ot$. 



IOI 




Vfti 



102 Orpheus Caledonius. 



XLV. 
Etrick Banks. 

ON Etrick Banks in a Summer's Night, 
At gloaming when the Sheep drove name, 
I met my Laffy bra' and tight, 
Came wading barefoot, a* her lane. 
My Heart grew light I ran, I flang 
My Arms about her lilly Neck, 
And kifs'd and clap'd her there fu' lang, 
My Words they were na' mony feck. 

I faid, my Laffy, will you go 
To the Highland Hills, the Erfh to learn ? 
I'll beath gi' thee a Cow and Yew, 
When you come to the Briggoi Earn. 
At Leithy auld Meal comes in, (ne'er fafh) 
And Herring at the broomy Law 5 
Chear up your Heart, my bonny Lafs, 
There's Gear to win we never faw. 



AH Day, when we ha' wrought enough, 
\y hen Winter's Froft and Snow begin, 



A&4,. 



E trick Banks 



j g frltH-r^ ^f spi^ 



Ojl JEtiick JBatrks in a burners ^-i-ijht, at Cxloining 



when the £heep drove hame I met my L afsie 




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lang.My- words they were nae monjr feck 



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y 



Orpheus Caledonius. 103 

And when the Sun goes Weft the Loch, 

At Night when you fa' faft to fpin ; 

I'll icrew my Drons, and play a Spring, 

And thus the weary Night we'll end, 

Till the tender Kids, and Lamb-time bring 

Our pleafant Summer back again. 




tLYU 



104 Orpheus Caledonius. 



XLVI. 
Had away from me, Donald. 

OHad away, had away, 
Had away frae me^ Donald ; 
Your Heart is made o'er lame for ane, 

It is not meet for me, Donald: 
Some fickle Miftrefs you may find, 
Will jilt as faft as thee, 'Donald \ 
To ilka Swain fhe will prove kind, 
And nae lefs kind to thee, 'Donald, 

But I've a Heart that's naething fuch, ' 

'Tisfill'd with Honefty, Donald^ 
I'll ne'er love mony, I'll love much, 

I'll hate all Levity, 'Donald. 
Therefore nae mair, with Art, pretend, 

Your Heart is chain'd to mine, 'Donald $ 
For Words of Falfhood I'll defend, 

A roving Love like thine, Donald, 

jFirft when you courted, I muft owni 
J frankly favour'dyou, 'Donalds 

Ap- \\ 



4*0" 

Had am ay -frae me, ID 02ZALD . 






zs 



**< : ll J 



O had awiy had away had away frae me, 



BS 



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XI 



™ Donald -voirr heart is made oer large for an 



5 



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I J Donald yoirr heart is made oer large for ane, it 



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I is not meet for me. Donald: Son 

I 



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is not meet for me, Donald: $ome fickle 



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Mifbrefs you may find, will jilt as fait as thee, 



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Donald; to ilka swain ihe will prove kind, and 

S 






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lefs Jcind to the, Donald 

'I I J i H i 



Orpheus Caledonius. 105 

Apparent Worth and fair Renown, 
Made me believe you true, 'Donald. 

Ilk Virtue then feem'd to adorn 

The Man efteem'd by me, Donald 1 

But now, the Mask fallen afF, 1 1 corn 
To ware a Thought on thee, Donald. 

And now, forever, had away, 

Had away from me, Donald • 
Gae feek a Heart that's like your ain, 

And come nae mair to me, Donald : 
For I'll referve my fell for ane, 

For ane that's liker me, 'Donald j 
If fie a ane I canna find, 

I'll ne'er loo Man, nor thee, Donald. 




Vol. II. P XLVII. 



io6 Orpheus Caledonius. 




XLVII. 
Gilderoy. 

Gilderoy was a bony Boy, 
When he came to the Glen, 
With filken Stockings on his Legs, 

And Rofes in his Shoon : 
He was a comely Sight to fee, 

My Dear, and only Joy 5 
But now he hangs high on a Tree, 
My poor, pale Gilderoy. 

Gilderoy was as brave a Man, 

As ever Scotland bred ; 
Defcended from a Highland Clan, 

But a Caper till his Trade. 
Our Fathers and our Mothers baith 

Of us they had great Joy ; 
Expefting ftill the Wedding- Day, 

'Tweenme and Gilderoy. 

When Gilderoy went to the GIe% 
He always choos'd the Fat 5 



And 



47 
G-ILDJEROY 




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Orpheus Caledonius. 107 

And in thefe Days there were not ten, 

With him durlt bell the Cat : 
For had he been as Walace (tout. 

And tall as T)almahoy, 
He never mift to get a Clout, 

Frae my Love Gilderoy. 

The Queen of ^/jpolTeiTed nought, 

That my Love let me want j 
For Cow and Ew he brought to me, 

And e'en when they were fcant : 
All thefe did hoaeftly poffefs, 

He never did annoy, 
Who never fail'd to pay their Cefs 

To my Love Gilderoy. 

But ah ! they catch'd him on a Hill, 

And baith his Hands they tied ; 
Alledging he had done much ill ; 

But Sons of Whores they lyed : 
Three Gallons large of Ufquebaugh, 

We drank to his laft Foy, 
Before he went for Edinburgh », 

My Deareft Gilderoy. 

To Edinburgh I followed faft 5 

But long e'er I came there, 
They had him mounted on a Maft, 

And wagging in the Air. 

P 2 His 



ro8 Orpheus Caledonius. 

His Relicks there were mair cfteem'd, 

Than Scanderbeg and Croy 5 
And e'vry Man was happy deem'd, 

That gaz'don Gilder oy. 

A'as ! that e'er fuch Laws were made, 

To hang a Man tor Gear ; 
Either for Healing Cow or Sheep, 

Or yet for Horfe or Mare : 
Had not the Laws then been fo find, 

I had never loft my Joy ; 
But now he lodges with auld Nkk y 

That hang'd my Gilder oy. 




XLVIIL 



48 



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XLVIII. 
John Ochiltree. 

HOneft Man John Ochiltree, 
Mine ain auld John Ochiltree, 
Wilt thou come o'er the Moor to me, 

And do as thou was wont to do ? \ 

Alake > alake ! 1 wont to do ! i • 

Ohon, Ohon ! I wont to do ! 
Now wont to do's away frae me, 

Frae filly auld John Ochiltree. 

Honeft Man John Ochiltree, 

Mine ain auld John Ochiltree ; 
Comeanes out o'er the Moor to me, 

And do but what thou dow to do. 

Alake, alake ! I dow to do ! 

Walaways ! I dow to do ! 
To whoft andhirple o'er my Tree, 

Is a' that I dow do to do. 

Walaways John Ochiltree, 
For mony a time I tell'd to thee, 
Thou'd tine the fpeed thy fell wad die, 
Poor, filly, auld John Ochiltree. 



no Orpheus Caledonius. 



XLIX. 

Willy 'j Rare and Willy 'j Fair. 

WILLI'S rare, and Willy's fair, 
And Willy s wond'rous bony 5 
And Willy heght to marry me, 
. Gin e'er he marry 'd ony. 

Yeftreen I made my Bed fu' brade, 
The Night 111 make it narrow ; 

For a' the live-long Winter's Night, 
I lie twin'd of my Marrow. 

O came you by yon Water-fide, 

Pu'd you the Rofe or Lilly ; 
Or came you by yon Meadow green, 

Or faw you my fweet Willy? 

She fought him Eaft, (he fought him Weft, 
She fought him brade and narrow > 

Sine in the clifting of a Craig, 
She found him drown'd in Tarrow. 



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A Table of the SONGS in 
! the fecond Volume. 

Page 

CRomleVs Lilt. ■ — i 

My Deary, if thou die. 4 

Sae merry as we have been 6 

The bonny Earl of Murray 8 

Wap at the Widow. ■ io 

The Wawking of the Faulds 1 2 

Jocky faid to J cany . 14 

'Dumbarton's Drums ■ i<s 

! Ye Gods ! was Strepkon's Pi&ure bleit 1 8 

For our lang biding here ■ 20 

Leader Haughs and Tarrow • ■ 2 1 

Gi'e me a Lafs with a Lump of Land 26 

One Day I heard Mary fay ■ 2 8 

I She raife and loot me in ■ — • 30 

Ew-Bughts, Marion • 32 

The Braes of Tarrow 3 4 

Lady Ann Bothwelh Lament ■ ■ 40 

Corn-Riggs are bonny. - 1 45 

The auld Goodman. ■ — ■ 47 

Lochaber * - 50 

Finkie Houfe 52 

When abfent from the Nymph I love 5 4 

Logan Water - — - 5 6 

The bonnieft Lafs in a' the Warld 5 7 

Clout 



Table*?/ SONGS in Vol. II. 

Clout the Caldron . 5 g| 

Willy was a wanton Wag . $ 

My Soger Laddie 63 

Allan Water ■ . 5! 

Tlu Peer of Leith - — 67 

J&^V Haggles — . 69 

I fix'd my Fancy on her — 7 r 

This is no mine ain Houfe - ^ 2 

Why hangs that Cloud upon thy Brow 74 . 

<p eat ie and Teggy — . 7(5 

The bonny Lais of Brankfome 1 7 g 

My )o Janet « 8o 

O Mitherdear, Tgih to.fear * . §3 

The Country Lafs 1 . 3- 

JMy Jocky blyth ■ 8 g 

Hero and Leander — — — . 90 

Todlen butt, and Todlen ben - 93 

The Glancing of her Apron , 9 > - 

The Birks of Endermay - 9 g 

Willie Winkie's Teftament 99 

Etrick Banks ■ — - IO a 

Had aw ay frae me, "Donald ■ 104. 

G ;r<?y I0 $ 

^^w Ochiltree __. IC 9 

Willy * Rare and Willy's hit iicj 

Sieepy Body . . ■ ,. . 1 j 2 



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